Queen Margrethe II’s Science Award goes to Professor of Crystallography

Professor Bo Brummerstedt Iversen, Department of Chemistry and iNANO, Aarhus University, received Queen Margrethe II’s Science Award on 19 April 2017. The award is presented to an outstanding researcher by the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters.

2017.04.20 | Christina Troelsen

HM Queen Margrethe II presented the award to Professor Bo Brummerstedt Iversen on 19 April 2017 at a ceremony at the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters. (Photo: Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters)

Professor Bo Brummerstedt Iversen. (Photo: Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters)

Professor Iversen carries out research into crystallography, material chemistry and nanoscience, and he is director of the Centre for Materials Crystallography (CMC) at Aarhus University.

His research covers a wide area, but the common denominator is always materials, ranging from fundamental basic research in the way materials are produced by synthesis to the characterisation of materials and their properties, and specific applications of materials, such as more efficient utilisation of waste heat.

Professor Iversen has previously received a number of other awards, including the Elite Researcher Prize (2011), the Grundfos Prize (2014) and the Order of the Dannebrog – Knight First Class (2015).

The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters justifies the allocation of Queen Margrethe II’s Science Award as follows: “Bo Brummerstedt Iversen’s research in materials crystallography is not only of a high scientific quality, but is also very important in our everyday lives. We are surrounded by crystals everywhere: table salt from the kitchen, ice in the freezer, our tooth enamel and sparkling gemstones. Bo Brummerstedt Iversen’s research provides us with an opportunity to look right into the atoms in these crystals and thereby gain an understanding of their structure and composition, and not least their numerous practical applications in our daily lives.”

In response to receiving the award, Professor Iversen says: “Just like art, research is a creative process and, and as a researcher, you are always uncertain of yourself. Being awarded a prize by the Queen of Denmark is a fantastic clap on the back and special recognition as a researcher, not only because she is our majesty, but also because she is a very creative person herself. I am extremely grateful.”

Read more about Queen Margrethe II’s Science Award 2017 (in Danish only) here.

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